Author Archive | Mike Long

Childcare Training Grant

SolicitudSubsidioDeCapacitacion_Espanol 2018

HealthSafetyTrainingGrant Application_English 2018

The YMCA CRS has started voucher program again!! If you are working in a licensed childcare home, or center you can apply for this grant. The cost of the classes with a CPR & First Aid voucher is only $10. Funding is limited so act fast! Keep in mind the Y will only give out 4 max per site!!
Feel free to call or email me with questions- Mike 619-281-3304
YMCA CRS -619-521.3055

Incidental medical services documents

Forms 15ccc-01 and 02 are the documentation directly from the department of social services that explains the requirements.

The word docs are the documents I created to meet this criteria for my center. My licensing Analyst reviewed them and said they met the criteria. But each analyst is different, so each school should submit them for review before assuming they are covered.
There is an overall plan of operation that is required, then individual documents for each kind of medical service provided. We only administer Inhalers/Nebulizer and Epi pens at our school. If we were to provide other medical services would need to write additional documents to explain our policy on each service.

This information is provided by Shelly Miner!

If anyone is interested in her Business Broker Services please call her.

Thanks Shelly
15CCC-01

15CCC-02

Administering Epi Pen

Administering Inhaled Medication
Shelly Miner
Child Care Business Broker
Miner Investments
949.246.0852
www.MinerInvestments.com

If you have any other questions, feel free to give me a call.
Mike 619-281-3304

Changing Epinephrine Laws

Changing Epinephrine Laws;
New California epinephrine regulations are taking effect January 1, 2016: “Certification from an approved training program will allow a layperson or off-duty EMS personnel to obtain a prescription for and administer an epinephrine auto-injector to a person experiencing anaphylaxis, with civil liability protection, when acting in good faith and not for compensation.” Follow link for more info:
http://www.emsa.ca.gov/Epinephrine_Auto-Injector_Training_and_Certification

AB 1207 Child Abuse Mandated Reporter Training Signed by Governor

It is now law that all childcare providers take the State Child Abuse Mandated Reporter Training;
This bill would, beginning January 1, 2018, require the department to develop and disseminate information to providers, administrators, and employees of licensed child day care facilities regarding detecting and reporting child abuse, and to provide training including statewide guidance on the responsibilities of those persons as mandated reporters, as provided. Beginning January 1, 2018, the bill would require those persons, as a condition of licensure, to complete that training provided by the department, as specified.
http://ctweb.capitoltrack.com/public/publishbillinfo.aspx?bi=f2GeA9JuRrjsghkpYY%2fKTs9uy%2brimeZGJV7mv8WgwGWvFKPcsLcgJKsKsbMM%2fl9v

AB 1207 Child Abuse Mandated Reporter Training Signed by Governor

It is now law that all childcare providers take the State Child Abuse Mandated Reporter Training;
This bill would, beginning January 1, 2018, require the department to develop and disseminate information to providers, administrators, and employees of licensed child day care facilities regarding detecting and reporting child abuse, and to provide training including statewide guidance on the responsibilities of those persons as mandated reporters, as provided. Beginning January 1, 2018, the bill would require those persons, as a condition of licensure, to complete that training provided by the department, as specified.

American Academy of Pediatrics “What’s the Latest With the Flu” Message for Child Care Providers

2014-2015 Influenza Season

The risk of Flu has decreased, but remains elevated overall in the United States. Remember that 80% of all influenza illness generally occurs in January, February, and March each year.

 

Get the Flu Vaccine Now

This year, one of the flu viruses that is causing illness in communities does not perfectly match the virus strains in the vaccine. This may lead to lower vaccine effectiveness against that virus (H3N2). The flu vaccine still offers some protection against H3N2, as well as protection against the other flu viruses expected to circulate this year. Some protection is better than no protection. Therefore, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) continues to recommend that all children 6 months and older (and their caregivers), who are eligible for influenza vaccination, be immunized against influenza as soon as possible.

 

Child care providers should continue to encourage the flu vaccine until the vaccine expiration date (June 30, marking the end of the influenza season), because influenza is unpredictable. After immunization, children generally remain protected for six months or longer. Influenza can have more than 1 disease peak and may extend into March or later. In addition, although the peak of influenza activity in the United States tends to occur in January through March, influenza activity can occur in early fall (ie, October and November) or late spring (eg, influenza circulated through the end of May during the 2013-2014 season). This gives ample opportunity to administer a second dose of vaccine when indicated. It should be noted that internationally, influenza can occur throughout the year. So children traveling overseas may either be at risk themselves or put other children at risk if they are not immunized, regardless of the time of the year.

 

As an important second line of defense, influenza antiviral treatment (for example, Tamiflu®) can lessen symptoms and shorten the time people are sick with the flu. It also may prevent serious flu complications. No child is too young to receive antiviral medicines for treatment. When someone has flu symptoms (sudden onset of fever; abdominal pain; chills; cough; croup, bronchiolitis, or pneumonia; decreased energy or feeling a lot more tired than usual; headache; muscle aches and pains; nasal congestion; nausea; sore throat), families should check with their doctor early on in the illness to see if antiviral treatment is recommended.

 

Practice Proper Cough and Sneeze Etiquette

Staff members and children should be taught to cover their mouths and noses with a tissue when they cough or sneeze, or they should be encouraged to cough into the elbow or shoulder (ie, not into their hands). After coughing/sneezing, everyone should be encouraged to wash their hands with soap and water. Consider displaying educational materials in the Head Start or early education and child care program to encourage proper hand hygiene and cough/sneeze etiquette.

 

Review Immunization Documentation

Programs should review immunization documentation records to confirm that children have been immunized for influenza. All child care facilities should require that parents/guardians of children enrolled in child care provide written documentation of receipt of immunizations appropriate for each child’s age.

 

Free Online Training Module

 

Resources

 

AAP/CDC Archived Webinar “Improving Head Start/Child Care and Community Readiness and Response to Seasonal Influenza”

 

AAP Caring for Our Children Manual

 

AAP Healthy Child Care America Web Site

 

AAP Managing Infectious Diseases

 

AAP Model Child Care Health Policies

 

AAP Preparing Child Care Programs for Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Web Page

 

AAP Preventing the Flu: Resources for Parents and Child Care Providers Web Page

 

CDC Fact Sheet No More Excuses: You Need a Flu Vaccine!

 

Head Start Health Services Newsletter “Preventing and Managing the Flu”

 

Families Fighting Flu Web Site

 

Flu Information – Free Print Materials from the CDC

 

Prevent Childhood Influenza Web Site

 

Childcare Safety Checklist

The Health and Safety Checklist for Early Care and Education Programs: Based on Caring for Our Children National Health and Safety Performance Standards – Third Edition is now available on the UCSF California Childcare Health Program Website!

The Health and Safety Checklist is a 112-item tool developed to assess key health and safety standards and identify ways to improve health and safety in early care and education (ECE) programs. The Checklist includes 72 out of the 138 key health and safety standards in Stepping Stones Third Edition.  The Checklist was reviewed by an advisory committee of health and safety experts and pilot tested by child care health consultants in North Carolina, Arizona and California. The Checklist is user-friendly, easy-to-understand and has links to the Caring for Our Children standards and other related resources.  It can be used on a computer, electronic tablet or smart phone or printed on paper and filled out by hand. The User Manual provides background information and guidelines for rating each item.

The Health and Safety Checklist for ECE:

www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org/pdfs/Checklists/HS_Checklist.pdf

The Health and Safety Checklist for ECE User Manual:

www.ucsfchildcarehealth.org/pdfs/Checklists/HS_Checklist_User%20Manual.pdf

 

Please feel free to share the Checklist with your colleagues and let us know if you have any questions.

Least Toxic Pest Control in Child Care: Free Online Class!

Please spread the word about a FREE, Online Professional Development opportunity that promotes safe learning environments for children. This class is designed for Pest Management Professionals who serve child care programs, however, ECE professionals and maintenance staff can also take the course.
====================================================================================================

From the Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health:

We are excited to present a new resource to promote safe learning environments for children in California, an online course for Pest Management Professionals. Here is a link:   http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/training/school-and-child-care-ipm.html

New changes s to the Healthy Schools Act in 2015 strongly encourage child care providers to use least toxic methods (called “integrated pest management”, or IPM)  to control pests and puts new training requirements on pest control companies serving childcare. To help Pest Management Professionals incorporate IPM and comply with the Healthy Schools Act, we developed a free online CEU course: Providing Integrated Pest Management Services in California Schools and Child Care. This course addresses:

  • The Healthy Schools Act
  • Common pests
  • The risks of pesticide exposure
  • Steps to implement IPM
  • Business aspects of IPM

We will keep a directory of Pest Management Professionals who have completed the course on our website (www.cerch.org/ipmtrainedpmps) to help  child care providers connect with professionals who have IPM training.
For questions, please contact me at abradman@berkeley.edu.

Best regards,

Asa Bradman, PhD, MS
Associate Director, Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health